Viewers Stories

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My journey began in 1996 with a lump in my left breast. My GYN said not to worry as the mass was moveable but referred me to a surgeon. He agreed that it was probably nothing to be concerned with but...

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My name is Robin Shipley and I wholeheartedly support Breast Cancer Research and Awareness. My family has no history of Breast Cancer or Cancer in general but I have 3 daughters, a mother, a...

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It all started with a small bump in my breast that grew into a huge massive ball inside me. I am 15 years old, 14 at the time when I found out I had a phyllodus breast cancer tumor and those are the...

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This story was written by my dear friend Melissa Champion-Hurst.

Last June, Jeanine Patten-Coble, one of my dear friends and colleagues, was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of...

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June 10 at 3:12pm I got by with all the help from my girls. I didn't know a Breast Cancer Survivor would have been part of my resume. Being a 6 month survivor has not only made me one strong woman it...

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In the spring of 2004 at the age of 36 I was a single, fun-loving, hard working NYC gal. In the summer of 2004 I was a single, fun-loving, hard-working NYC gal WITH CANCER. Hardly ever going to the...

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In the fall of 2000, shortly after giving birth to my daughter, I found a large golf ball size mass in my right breast. At first I thought nothing of it; I was only 29 and had had a healthy normal...

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I will never forget April 10, 2009. At 36, I was diagnosed with breast cancer. I was shocked, and told myself it was a mistake. Then I cried, what do I tell my three children. I endured seven...

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Okinawa, Japan, May 1994. Here I was teaching English. Newly married. Eating Sushi. Exercising. In the best shape of my life. Thirty-one years old. And, newly diagnosed with breast cancer? Actually,...

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Kathie Guerrero's Story

In the fall of 2000, shortly after giving birth to my daughter, I found a large golf ball size mass in my right breast. At first I thought nothing of it; I was only 29 and had had a healthy normal pregnancy. It wasn't until my 30th birthday a month later that I finally went back to my doctor and showed her the lump. After a mammogram, ultrasound and a breast biopsy I was told I had breast cancer. It was stage 3 so my doctor and I decided on very aggressive treatment: a double mastectomy followed by chemotherapy and radiation. My main focus was on getting healthy for my two children so I put off any kind of reconstruction, but after 4 years of being cancer free I finally decided to go ahead with breast reconstruction. Three surgeries later, I had beautiful breasts again. I stayed healthy and cancer free until early 2007 when a nagging pain in my left hip led to an MRI and the discovery that the cancer had come back and had metastasized to my bones. My children were now 10 and 7; telling them the cancer was back was the hardest thing I had to do. My anger at this rotten disease coming back in to my life was overwhelming. It took weeks for me to wrap my brain around my new reality and get on with the job of getting better. I have now been on constant chemotherapy of one sort or another since February of 2007. I've been bald 3 separate times. In June of last year a routine PET scan showed the cancer had spread significantly, no longer confined to just the bones. There were several tumors in my liver, right lung and chest lymph nodes. As bad as it was, it also gave my doctor the opportunity to finally get a biopsy of this new incarnation of my cancer. A liver biopsy gave him valuable information about the cancer's characteristics and allowed him to make an informed choice for future chemotherapy treatment. I am on a three drug combination that has totally eradicated the tumors in my liver and lungs, as well as the lymph nodes. The cancer in my bones has either receded or stabilized. It is very important to me to let people know that even with metastatic disease I am living a full, happy life. I go for chemo every three weeks, I sleep a lot and my energy level isn't what it used to be. But most of the time it is very easy to forget I have cancer, and anyone meeting me for the first time would never know. I have some physical limitations because of the bone damage in my left hip which can be frustrating, but in the grand scope of things it is a small price to pay for being here and being able to raise my children. I recently celebrated my 40th birthday with family and friends. For me, every birthday is a huge milestone, another year that I am winning the war. Kathie Guerrero