Viewers Stories

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Okinawa, Japan, May 1994. Here I was teaching English. Newly married. Eating Sushi. Exercising. In the best shape of my life. Thirty-one years old. And, newly diagnosed with breast cancer? Actually,...

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My name is Robin Shipley and I wholeheartedly support Breast Cancer Research and Awareness. My family has no history of Breast Cancer or Cancer in general but I have 3 daughters, a mother, a...

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In the fall of 2000, shortly after giving birth to my daughter, I found a large golf ball size mass in my right breast. At first I thought nothing of it; I was only 29 and had had a healthy normal...

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My journey began in 1996 with a lump in my left breast. My GYN said not to worry as the mass was moveable but referred me to a surgeon. He agreed that it was probably nothing to be concerned with but...

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June 10 at 3:12pm I got by with all the help from my girls. I didn't know a Breast Cancer Survivor would have been part of my resume. Being a 6 month survivor has not only made me one strong woman it...

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It all started with a small bump in my breast that grew into a huge massive ball inside me. I am 15 years old, 14 at the time when I found out I had a phyllodus breast cancer tumor and those are the...

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In the spring of 2004 at the age of 36 I was a single, fun-loving, hard working NYC gal. In the summer of 2004 I was a single, fun-loving, hard-working NYC gal WITH CANCER. Hardly ever going to the...

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This story was written by my dear friend Melissa Champion-Hurst.

Last June, Jeanine Patten-Coble, one of my dear friends and colleagues, was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of...

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I will never forget April 10, 2009. At 36, I was diagnosed with breast cancer. I was shocked, and told myself it was a mistake. Then I cried, what do I tell my three children. I endured seven...

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Robin Shipley's Story

My name is Robin Shipley and I wholeheartedly support Breast Cancer Research and Awareness. My family has no history of Breast Cancer or Cancer in general but I have 3 daughters, a mother, a grand-daughter, aunts, nieces, sister-in-laws, teachers and tons of girlfriends so this is a very important concern of mine. I am currently training for the 3 day/60 mile Susan G. Komen in Scottsdale, AZ where I will be walking 20 miles a day for 3 days in a row for a total of 60 miles. I did this 4 years ago, it was brutal but at least I know what I’m up against. Unbelievable blisters, chaffing, a lost toenail, shin splints, aching low back, arch pain, knee pain, you name it, I felt it. I completed the 60 mile in 2006. I came home elated only to end up calling an ambulance in the middle of the night for being Dehydrated…very scary experience. None of this compares to the discomfort of nausea from chemo, the after effects of radiation, losing all of one's hair, aching body etc. that happens when one undergoes treatment,not to mention the fear of dying. Why, on EARTH would one do this AGAIN? I play competitive tennis here in Tucson, AZ and I have over the last 3 years made dear sweet friendships with 4 gals who are SURVIVORS! They are AMAZING women who did not give up! They are back on the courts playing competitively. I am so glad they are all in remission and healthy. I am so grateful to be their friend. I did not know them while they were undergoing treatment, but I have felt inspired to walk in their honor. Actually, it’s a surprise, they are not aware and I will not tell them until November. I am so excited to do this walk. I know it will be difficult but I will think of what sweet friendships I have and how raising the mandatory $2,300.00 donation/entry fee was so easy with the help of my wonderful tennis friends that are supporting me along with other friends and family. I was able to TALK the TALK, now I have to WALK the WALK! I hope I am making a difference in other women's lives, who knows the life I save may be my very own. RobinShipley